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Tropical Cyclone Funso

January 26, 2012
Suomi NPP Science

Shown above is a VIIRS (375-m resolution) infared view of Tropical Cyclone Funso on January 24, 2012. The coasts of Mozambique (left) and Madagascar (right) can be seen on either side of the storm. + view large

Tropical Cyclone Funso brought gusty conditions and flooding rain to the coastal regions of Mozambique.


The Visible infared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument, a scanning radiometer, collects visible and infared imagery and radiometric measurements of the land, atmosphere, cryosphere, and oceans.

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The coasts can be seen on either side of the storm in this true color image of Tropical Cyclone Funso on January 24. + view large

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This is a close-up infared view of Tropical Cyclone Funso on January 24. Note that the outward-sloped eyewall is evident in terms of brightness temperature gradients as you move from the center of the eye outward. + view large

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A closeup visible view from VIIRS I-band-1 (375-m resolution) on January 24 at 1102 UTC of Tropical Cyclone Funso. + view large

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Note that a very small inner eyewall can be seen; presumably, an eyewall replacement cycle is underway. This VIIRS infared view of Tropical Cyclone Funso taken 2215 UTC on January 24. + view large

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The clear eye and symmetric nature of the storm are indications that it's quite strong and well-organized. This VIIRS infared view of Tropical Cyclone Funso on January 25 at 1043 UTC. + view large

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The coasts can be seen on either side of the storm. This VIIRS visible image of Tropical Cyclone Funso from January 25 2012 at 1043 UTC. + view large

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A close-up visible image of Tropical Cyclone Funso on January 25. Note how the western eyewall appears to be sloped as you ascend from the east to the west. This is likely a scan angle effect since the center of the VIIRS swath was a few hundred kilometers to the east of the storm, but it's also possible that the inner vortex is tilted to the west. + view large

Credit: NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/RAMMB and the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

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