NASA Logo, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
header

VIIRS : The Science Collection

→ Go to VIIRS Instrument Overview

VIIRS, a scanning radiometer, collects visible and infrared imagery and radiometric measurements of the land, atmosphere, cryosphere, and oceans. It extends and improves upon a series of measurements initiated by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). VIIRS data is used to measure cloud and aerosol properties, ocean color, sea and land surface temperature, ice motion and temperature, fires, and Earth's albedo. Climatologists use VIIRS data to improve our understanding of global climate change. Get more information about the VIIRS instrument.

NPP feature image
Aerosol Optical Thickness Over Europe
The atmosphere is a mix of gases and fine particles called aerosols. Some of these particles, like ash and dust, are large enough that they can be seen by the human eye, while others are microscopic. Regardless of their size, aerosols scatter and absorb light, which means they can be detected from space. Aerosol optical thickness data is shown here from the Suomi NPP VIIRS sensor.
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Muddy waters flow into the Rio de la Plata
Muddy waters flow into the Rio de la Plata estuary in this relatively cloud free image taken by the Suomi NPP satellite on March 23, 2014. The city of Buenos Aires, Argentina can be seen along the left bank of the estuary, along with the city of Montevideo, Uruguay on the far northern coast
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Eruption of Mount Kelud in Indonesia Caught By Suomi NPP
Suomi NPP capturing the ash cloud emanating from the Mount Kelud volcano. Mount Kelud erupted just hours before, causing the evacuation of over 75,000 people, and impacting air travel in the region. Satellite analysis shows that the ash cloud is moving southwest into the Indian Ocean.
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Cyclone Helen Skirts Madagascar
Cyclone Helen is spinning in the Mozambique Channel between Madagascar and the African continent. Shown here in this Suomi NPP satellite image taken on March 30th, 2014 while the storm was near its peak Category 2 intensity, Cyclone Helen has since weakened while skirting the Madagascar coast. The forecast path will take the storm west into Mozambique as a tropical storm over the next few days.
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Tropical Cyclone Dylan Making Landfall in Australia
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image of Tropical Cyclone 11P on January 28 at 04:19 UTC, revealing a more rounded circulation than the previous day, and bands of thunderstorms over the storm's southern semi-circle. Image Credit: NASA/NOAA/NRL
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
More Precise Hurricane Forecasts with NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP VIIRS Satellite Sensor
Tropical Storm Flossie imagery in July 2013 from Suomi NPP's VIIRS Day-Night band revealing that the storm shifted more to the north, sparing the big island of Hawaii from a direct hit, but bringing the islands of Oahu, Molokai and Maui into a tropical storm warning area. Image Credit: NOAA
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Tracking dust across the Atlantic
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, or VIIRS, on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite captured these images of a Saharan dust storm on July 31 and August 1-2, 2013. Each image is a composite of three adjacent satellite passes. (Ozone Mapping Profiling Suite instrument's Limb Profiler )
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Ocean Chlorophyll Concentrations (Northern Hemisphere)
This image shows season-long composites of ocean chlorophyll concentrations derived from visible radiometric measurements made by the VIIRS instrument on Suomi NPP. The date ranges are included. This false-colored image makes the data stand out. The purple and blue colors represent lower chlorophyll concentrations. The oranges and reds represent higher chlorophyll concentrations. These differences in color indicate areas with lesser or greater phytoplankton biomass. Credit: NASA/Suomi NPP/Norman Kuring
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Ocean Chlorophyll Concentrations (Southern Hemisphere)
This image shows season-long composites of ocean chlorophyll concentrations derived from visible radiometric measurements made by the VIIRS instrument on Suomi NPP. The date ranges are included. This false-colored image makes the data stand out. The purple and blue colors represent lower chlorophyll concentrations. The oranges and reds represent higher chlorophyll concentrations. These differences in color indicate areas with lesser or greater phytoplankton biomass. Credit: NASA/Suomi NPP/Norman Kuring
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Calm Skies Over Three Oceans
We live on a dynamic, restless planet. On any given day, there is usually a cyclone, tropical depression, or extra-tropical storm brewing somewhere on the Earth. But for a brief moment this week, the skies over all of the oceans were relatively calm. The image above is a composite of fourteen polar satellite passes, or swaths, stitched together from September 8, 2013. The natural-color images were acquired by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite.
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite Captures Hurricane Barbara at Night
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite captured a nighttime image of Hurricane Barbara before it made landfall in southwestern Mexico. The image was taken on May 29 at 08:22 UTC (4:22 a.m. EDT). In the image city lights from Mexico City and Coatzacoalcos were seen to the north and east of Barbara's center.
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Fontenelle Fire in Wyoming
The VIIRS instrument on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite captured this image showing smoke pouring out from the Fontenelle Fire in Wyoming, located just 18 miles (29 kilometers) west of Big Piney. The mid-infrared sensors on VIIRS show the red contours representing the heat from the fires. The blaze, first reported at 4 p.m. local time on June 24, still continues to burn. According to Inciweb, as of July 16 the fire had burned 64,083 acres. In the image strong southwesterly winds carried the thick smoke towards the northeast.
+ view image
NPP feature image
Tropical Cyclone Amara
VIIRS infrared window channel (left) and Day-Night Band (right) imagery for tropical cyclone Amara in the South Indian Ocean at 20:45 UTC (12:45 p.m. local time) on December 22, 2013. The center of this weak cyclone is indicated by the red X in each image. The center is very difficult to locate in the infrared imagery, but is readily seen in the VIIRS Day-Night band image. The VIIRS Day-Night band provides unique data for finding the center of tropical cyclones during the night. (CREDIT: NOAA National Hurricane Center)
+ view image
NPP feature image
Formation of New Ice
The formation of new ice is visible in this image captured by the NOAA/NASA Suomi-NPP Satellite.
+ view image
NPP feature image
Tropical Storm Flossie
New satellite instrument takes guesswork out of Flossie's nighttime track July 31, 2013
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Sea Surface Temperature Measurements
This image reflects sea surface temperature measurements taken by the Suomi-NPP VIIRS instrument off of the New England coast in October 2012. (CREDIT: NOAA STAR)
+ view image
NPP feature image
Korea and the Yellow Sea
On September 24, 2012, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite captured this nighttime view of the Korean Peninsula. This imagery is from the VIIRS "day-night band," which detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe signals such as city lights, gas flares, auroras, wildfires, and reflected moonlight.
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
The Lights of London
Billions of people will see London through many different filters and lenses during the 2012 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games. None of those views will look quite like this one from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite.
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Western U.S. High Mountain Blazes
Two of the most destructive fires in the history of Colorado and New Mexico have both now been contained. These image comparisons show how the Little Bear Fire and the High Park Fire grew over a 24-hour time period from June 9 to June 10. The red contours on the images represent areas of heat showing active fires. Taken by the VIIRS instrument, these images provide active fire data as emergency response teams continue to fight the fires.
+ go to feature
NPP feature image
Power Outages in Washington, DC Area
These before and after images from show the power outages in the clear skies over Washington, DC and Baltimore that occurred as a result of a rare, fast-moving thunderstorm system on Friday, June 29th.
+ go to feature
NPP science image
Tropical Cyclone Funso
Suomi NPP's VIIRS instrument provides various looks of Tropical Cyclone Funso.
+ go to feature
Suomi NPP science image
NPP's 'Blue Marble'
A 'Blue Marble' image of the Earth taken from Suomi NPP's VIIRS instrument . This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth's surface taken on January 4, 2012.
+ go to feature
Suomi NPP Science
Hurricane Kenneth
True color image of Hurricane Kenneth over the northeastern Pacific Ocean on 22 November 2011. True color imagery is created using the red (0.672 µm), green (0.555 µm) and blue (0.488 µm) M-bands on VIIRS, all at 750-m resolution.
+ view large
Suomi NPP Science
Smog Comparisons
True color image over northeastern India, Nepal and Tibet. Note the large amount of smog/pollution over India relative to Tibet, and how the mountains keep it all
+ view large
Suomi NPP Science
One granule from the new "day-night band."
This image is from the middle of the night on 11 January, so the clouds you're seeing are purely due to light reflected from the moon back to the satellite. Also visible are the city lights from parts of south Florida and lightning flashes atop the convection in the Gulf of Mexico.
+ view large
Suomi NPP science image
First Global Image from VIIRS
The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) gets a complete view of our planet every day. This image from November 24, 2011, is the first complete global image from VIIRS.
+ go to feature [earth observatory]
Suomi NPP science image
Suomi NPP Satellite Acquires First VIIRS Image
This Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) image is of a broad swath of Eastern North America from Canada's Hudson Bay past Florida to the northern coast of Venezuela.
+ go to feature 1 [nasa.gov]
+ go to feature 2 [earth observatory]



Suomi-NPP Science Observations

View by Sensor :
VIIRS | CrIS | ATMS | CERES | OMPS

View by Year :
2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011


The Suomi-NPP Marble Collection These various global views and animations of the Earth are composites assembled from data acquired by the Suomi-NPP satellite. + view collection


NASA logo
Goddard Space Flight Center